Santa Fe’s Film Heritage

Santa Fe’s Film Heritage

For nearly two decades, the five-day Santa Fe Film Festival has celebrated the best in cinematic arts, both locally and globally.  

 The 17th annual event is a must-do for film buffs, art enthusiasts, and anyone who appreciates a unique cultural experience. The program features more than 80 films, panels, juried awards, workshops, and parties to celebrate Santa Fe’s rich heritage in film.  

 Festival attendees can mingle with filmmakers from all over the world and enjoy screenings of some highly artistic and intriguing films that have been delicately curated by festival organizers.  

 The 2017 Santa Fe Film Festival is December 6-10, and features narrative and documentary films, shorts of all kinds, and tributes to world-renowned film artists and industry professionals. There is also a special spotlight on New Mexican filmmakers and film crews.  

 Don’t miss Santa Fe’s leading exhibition and educational gateway into all things cinematic in New Mexico. Come visit and watch!

Midday Munching

Midday Munching

Spending a morning strolling downtown Santa Fe and exploring galleries and shops can really work up an appetite. For the perfect midday nosh, stop by Palacio Café.  

From enchilada plates to tacos, smothered burritos, and burgers, Palacio Café makes choosing what’s for lunch pretty tough. No matter what you decide, you won’t be disappointed. And, the big portions will leave you so stuffed, you’ll have to head back to the hotel for a quick nap.  

On the lighter side, there’s a large sandwich menu with many panini and cold sandwich options, including the popular piled-high Palacio Club. Or, you can choose a bowl of pozole or one of the featured salads. Plus, there are plenty of vegetarian options.   

If you get there before 11 a.m., you can savor one of the café’s breakfast items. Think: breakfast burritos, tacos, omelets, and more.  

The cozy Palacio Café is also a great stop for an afternoon espresso or fresh-squeezed lemonade break. Grab a sidewalk table for great people watching and take in the neighborhood.  

Santa Fe misses you! Call us today to book your stay!

Chocolate Heaven Is a Place on Earth

Chocolate Heaven Is a Place on Earth

Chocoholics will find a little slice of heaven right in the heart of Santa Fe, with a truly unique chocolate experience at Kakawa.

Kakawa Chocolate House specializes in historic and authentic drinking chocolate elixirs based on recipes from ancient Mesoamerica, medieval Europe, and colonial America. Served in small hand-painted blue and white Mexican mugs, the flavorful chocolate is barely sweetened, fragrant, and spiced to meet a wide variety of tastes.

Along with the rich chocolate elixirs, Kakawa makes many one-of-a-kind chocolate creations, all made in small batches. Truffles, agave caramels, chili-flavored chocolates, mendiants, chocolate bars, and homemade ice cream are just some of the delicious creations made by Kakawa’s artisans.

Kick up your chocolate habit with the Chile D’arbols, whole roasted New Mexico Arbol chilis dipped in agave caramel and covered with house-blended dark chocolate. Or sip on one of Kakawa’s enticing elixirs. It’s a chocolate oasis in the city, with a bit of culinary history for you to experience.

Getting hungry? Start planning your trip to Santa Fe.

Christmas Eve in Santa Fe

Christmas Eve in Santa Fe

The holiday season here in Santa Fe is one of our favorite times of the year. Lights, music, and a host of annual activities make this a magical place to visit during the Christmas season. But if we could choose just one night to be here in Santa Fe, it would be Christmas Eve.

 

On Christmas Eve, Canyon Road (home to many of the city’s art galleries) is closed to traffic, and the city gathers there to celebrate. The street is alight with thousands of fairy lights, and luminarias (also known as farolitos) which are sand filled paper bags with candles in them that line the sidewalks and the tops of buildings and walls. Historically, this tradition started as small bonfires that were made with crisscrossed piñon branches built in squares about three-feet high and are said to light the way for the Christ child. These beautifully, lit walkways have been a part of Santa Fe tradition since the 19th century.  

 

Starting at dusk, people wander up and down Canyon road, enjoying the sights, and warming themselves up by visiting the many galleries and shops that stay open to offer hot chocolate and cookies. There are even wandering groups of carolers, helping spread the holiday cheer. It’s a time for everyone in Santa Fe to come out and celebrate together.

 

After visiting Canyon Road, many people head over to midnight mass at the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Francis de Assisi. The doors usually open at 10:30pm, with Lessons and Carols starting at 11pm. By the time the mass starts at midnight, there is not an empty seat. It’s a wonderful blending of Catholic & Santa Fe traditions and not to be missed. If you’re looking for an earlier mass, San Miguel Mission – the oldest church in the United States – offers mass at 7 pm.   

 

Christmas in Santa Fe offers so many different ways to celebrate the holidays. Our location means that you are walking distance to all the holiday festivities, from luminarias and concerts, to midnight mass. Check our availability so you can be close to all the wonderful holiday festivities!  

How Time Slips Away in Santa Fe

The Inn on the Alameda stands poised to begin its 30th year of business in Santa Fe. During that time I have gone from my latter 30’s to my latter 60’s, and my son Michael has grown from 2 to 31. What fortunate blessings have been bestowed upon us and our property. What began as a 36 room limited service property has now doubled in size, abandoned its little portable lobby bar, enclosed the outdoor patio and risen in national stature and recognition. The Agoyo Lounge is now where that patio was, and a new and improved bar will be installed this coming early spring.

Agoyo is a Tewa Pueblo word for star or under the stars which was used by an early Pueblo employee for the patio’s nickname before it was enclosed. Then the night skies were darker since Santa Fe was much smaller and the stars more brilliant than even today, which is hard to imagine. We enclosed the patio because we had completely underestimated the seating capacity at breakfast on inclement rainy or snowing days, when few guests wished to enjoy the town until the early chill had gone. Cramming 72 guests in the small lobby was an impossibility and we always relied on the outdoor patio. Our front Sun Room was leased to the Galisteo News, a very cool espresso/coffee/ croissant precursor to Starbucks, so unlike now, it was unavailable for guests’ breakfast.

Agoyo LoungeThose were very exciting days for many reasons, but the best being was being named by USA today in 1986, our first year, as one of the top 10 romantic destinations in the country. With the brilliant guidance of Alice Marshall, our New York City based publicist, we began garnishing top 100, 200 and 500 hotels awards and acclaim from Conde Nast and Travel & Leisure. Along side our staff and location Alice stands as the 3rd leg of the stool for our amazing climb to even international recognition. Our breakfast room proudly displays the most astounding and notable covers of these two magazines.

As our 3rd decade ends, it is hard not to feel nostalgic looking back at all the wonderful people that have shaped the Inn. Kathy Lynch, our night auditor, has been here since we opened, and many of our people have stayed for more than 20 years. This has allowed a familiarity, warmth and even friendships to grow during this time. As we regularly see in write-ups of guests’ experiences that it is “like coming home”. So at this holiday season, a time of family gatherings, we welcome all of our guests to enjoy a hot drink in the Agoyo Lounge, bundle up, and stand under the brilliant night skies and thank the powers that be for all there is that is still good in the world.

Joe’s Blog: Open Fires & Hot Toddies

 

 

fire

One of New Mexico’s signature scents is the roaring open fire, burning bright with Pinon and juniper. At the Inn on the Alameda we’d like to also include the tempting scents of hot cider cocktails and Toddies.

PicMonkey Collage

Toddy Stick & Jerry Thomas

Hot drinks are an American tradition. Early Colonial era gatherings were enlivened with the tradition of “Flipping” drinks, adding a hot iron to the cocktail to make it froth and “flip” about. The earliest recipes consisted of a blend of beer, rum and sugar. Over time, eggs were added and the beer was reduced. Eventually this drink evolved into the now familiar nogs.The father of modern Bartending, the famed Jerry Thomas, included many variations of flips in his influential books on cocktails.

www.brandyrand.com

www.brandyrand.com

No discussion of hot drinks would be complete without mentioning the traditional Irish balm: the Hot Toddy. Mixing whiskey with boiling water, sugar or honey, lemon and spices provides a revivifying effect. The vitamin C and honey help explain the soothing efficacy of the drink in treating the cold effects of winter. The toddy can be fine tuned in many different ways to individualize the drink. In the Midwestern United States it can be made with the addition of ginger ale, a decidedly non-traditional preparation.

It is good naturedness that provides the final element of hot drink perfection, the quality of welcome, which you will find at the Inn on the Alameda. Cultures around the world have terms to refer to this ineffable quality. For Germans it’s called Gemütlichkeit, the quality of a situation or location that induces a sense of welcoming coziness and unhurried warmth. That’s a standard we’re proud to offer – come see us soon for a soul-warming beverage of your choice.

BOOK NOW