Joe’s Blog: A Santa Fe 4th of July

Joe’s Blog: A Santa Fe 4th of July

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*Unfortunately due to ongoing concerns over COVID 19 Santa Fe has cancelled all 4th of July Festivities*

Many flags have flown over Santa Fe from long before the first celebration of the 4th of July. New Mexico would not become any legal part of the United States until 1848 following the Mexican-American War. So the first 4th of July celebration was most likely observed when New Mexico entered the Union as a Territory (no elected representation in Washington), which she remained until gaining Statehood in 1912. Prior to this, there was a rich tradition of religious and civic festivals such as the Santa Fe Fiesta and the various Catholic saint days that made up an important part of colonial life.

In the United States, the original 13 colonies created most of the national celebrations, while religious observances handled the others. While the Congress passed a Resolution of Independence from England on July 2, 1776, it was not until 2 days later that the founding fathers signed the Declaration of Independence – on July 4th. In the following year in Rhode Island, the 4th was saluted with the firing of 13 guns representing the 13 original colonies.

This most certainly was the beginning of a tradition of firework displays in all communities and backyards throughout the nation.

But remember, while the firing of the 13 cannons mark this day, any conscientious citizen owes it to himself and nation to contemplate the meaning of this day of independence and what it represents. We embraced the spirit of the Enlightenment and freed ourselves from the chains of monarchy and foreign rule, embarking upon the most unique voyage of religious, political and civic freedoms the world has seen.

Happy 4th of July!

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The Zen Forest

The Zen Forest The Winsor Trail is Santa Fe’s gateway into the Pecos Wilderness from the west. Its most popular trailhead is near the western end of the large parking area of Ski Santa Fe, at an elevation of 10,240 feet. On the map for which I’ve provided...

read more

See Santa Fe like a Local

See Santa Fe like a Local

Sudden Spring Snow in the Sangres

If you’ve been traveling through the blogosphere with us over the last month, you’ll note that the quest for free entertainment has been an ongoing process. Travels in the east stimulated a search for some things a traveler can do for free right here in Santa Fe. As with all destinations, ideas for free fun differ, but these are a few suggestions for times when you want to save your cash for Santa Fe’s restaurant experiences, which can easily consume some hard-earned travelers’ checks.

That being said, we’ll forgo a corny Top Ten list and just offer ten ideas, in no particular order of preference, for entertainment that won’t break the travel budget and are accessible most times of the year, even in the event of a unexpected springtime snowstorm!

Walk to the Cross of the Martyrs

This is one of the best spots to see an approaching summer storm or a glorious Santa Fe sunset downtown, particularly if you are here without a car. The vistas are expansive, so much so that one could actually see the devastating flames of the Cerro Gordo fire that swept through Los Alamos some years back. You’ll get some excellent exercise climbing up the short but steep hill, which is also a favored destination for those who want to watch Zozobra burn but want to stay off the overly crowded field.

The Cross of the Martyrs

Enjoy Summerscene on the Plaza

The annual Summerscene on the Plaza series offers a chance to relax on the grass with a picnic lunch or dinner or rock out with your dance partner to some of the best local bands. Unfortunately due to the local social distancing protocols it is still uncertain as to when, or even if they will happen this year. To stay updated visit: https://santafebandstand.org/

Summerscene on the Plaza 2009

The Southwest Reading Room at the Santa Fe Public Library

Go Back to the Book

Sure, you’ve done it, but have you done it recently? Visited the library that is! In the world of the smartphone and the iPad, a bit of peace and quiet in a good, old-fashioned library is a most welcome thought. Visit the Southwest Reading room at the Santa Fe Public Library and wander through the stacks looking at old, out-of-print tomes about the Southwest, which you can peruse in the hushed ambiance of this lovely room. Hard to believe that this building was once the downtown Santa Fe police station!

Hike the Atalaya Trail

If a more phyical experience is what you want, but you’re not inclined to drive too far to get one, head for the very accessible Atalaya Trail, located near St. John’s College. The vertical incline of this trail offers a sufficient challenge while not consuming an entire day of your valuable time in the City Different.

St. John’s College Santa Fe

Attend a Lecture or Concert at St. John’s College

And speaking of St. John’s, this educational gem welcomes all to a series of free lectures and concerts that take place throughout the school year. While the topic can sometimes be challenging, if not downright intimidating, the St. John’s tutors are a multi-talented group who share their intellects and interests freely.

The Scottish Rite Masonic Center

Tour the Scottish Rite Masonic Temple

Wonder what the small-scale replica of the Alhambra is? Located on the corner of Washington Street and the Paseo de Peralta, this architectural curiosity is the home of the Santa Fe Order of Masons and now hosts a variety of performances and events in its sweet little auditorium. Docent tours of this lovely building, dedicated in 1912, can be arranged by calling (505) 982-4414.

Shidoni Sculpture Garden

Visit the Shidoni Sculpture Garden

Although not technically free since you have to factor in the gas for the car, this is an opportunity to see an acre plus of over-sized and whimsical art in the outdoors. Located in the beautiful village of Tesuque, just 7 miles north of Santa Fe on Bishop’s Lodge Road, visiting Shidoni Sculpture Garden is a wonderful way to see the inspiring landscape of New Mexico and stroll past works by some of Santa Fe’s sculptural masters. In the warmer months, you are welcome to attend Saturday bronze pourings, typically held at 1pm, 2:45pm and 4pm, at which you can learn about how castings are done.

Attend a Pueblo Dance

One of the most intriguing things about New Mexico is the living Native American culture. The remoteness of the state along with its late entry into the U.S. (in 1912, with our centennial to be celebrated in 2012) allowed the Pueblo culture to continue uninterrupted and uncorrupted for years, and attending a feast day is an opportunity to see the unbroken chain of festivities. Seeing the Pueblos also requires a bit of driving and gas, but close to Santa Fe, a few miles north across the highway from Shidoni is the Pueblo of Tesuque, which holds its annual feast day on November 12, in honor of San Diego. Please be sure to observe Pueblo protocol: no photos, no recordings, no note-taking and no entry into a Pueblo home without an invitation.

Head for the New Mexico Visitors’ Center

While not strictly what you might call an entertainment, a visit to the New Mexico Tourism Visitors’ Center at the corner of the Paseo de Peralta and the Old Santa Fe Trail will yield much in the way of destination planning. The knowledgeable and friendly staff there are always happy to share their own ideas for fun, and the place is chock full of maps and guides and brochures. And if you want to “visit” before visiting, the state’s website offers a live chat option!

In Search of the Way

On the subject of maps, you can find all you need right next door to the Inn at The Travel Bug! Maps, topo maps, travel guides and travel gear, along with a friendly dispensing of information, are all at hand, and you are welcome to sit and dream about your next travel destination over coffee for as long as you like. Free parking in the rear for those not staying at the Inn!

A Plethora of Places to Peruse at the Travel Bug

So visit Santa Fe like the locals do….with open eyes and a slim wallet, you can still go far!

The Zen Forest

The Zen Forest The Winsor Trail is Santa Fe’s gateway into the Pecos Wilderness from the west. Its most popular trailhead is near the western end of the large parking area of Ski Santa Fe, at an elevation of 10,240 feet. On the map for which I’ve provided...

read more
Randall Davey Audubon Center

Randall Davey Audubon Center

RANDALL DAVEY AUDUBON CENTER

Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary main sign

Sometimes you just need a quick getaway from town, a breath of fresh air, a place to stretch your legs without too many people around, and maybe a spot just to sit and be quiet for awhile. We have the perfect destination for you: The Randall Davey Audubon Center, just a couple of miles from the Inn on the Alameda, with good parking at either the Center itself, or just off Upper Canyon Road, at the Santa Fe River Canyon Nature Preserve. Both are free.

It’s a lovely place to have a short hike and there are a variety of paths in the Nature Preserve south of the Center, with interpretive signs here and there. The “serious” birders are also quick to post their sightings.

Randall Davey Hiker

A pleasant walk on a winter afternoon. That’s Picacho Peak above.

Randall-Davey-interpretive-sign

An interpretive sign near the classroom and nature store

Randall Davey bird sign

Catch of the day

A friend and I love to stop by the River Preserve to see what the beavers have been up to. Lately they’ve been rearranging their dams.  “Busy as a beaver” doesn’t begin to describe these creatures. It’s amazing what they can accomplish!

Randall Davey new bear pond

The latest engineering project on the Santa Fe River

Randall Davey chewed tree

An evening’s nosh

Randall Davey felled tree

And down, ready for stripping and hauling. That’s a big tree!

There are already plenty of birds to see, even though it’s still February, and more are no doubt on the way. The robins are back – that’s always encouraging – and we also spotted mallards on the beaver ponds, scrub jays, white-breasted nuthatches, pine siskins, juncos, two kinds of towhees, and a pair of red-tailed hawks circling overhead, keeping everyone in line. The usual menagerie of reptiles is absent since it’s still winter, so for those of you averse to slithery things, this is a great time for a walk.

Getting There:

From the Inn on the Alameda, turn east on Alameda Street (toward the mountains) and follow it along the tree-lined Santa Fe River until it makes a sharp right turn. At the stop sign at the intersection with Upper Canyon Road, turn left and enjoy a slow drive through a very picturesque section of Old Santa Fe until the road makes an abrupt left turn. Here you have a couple of choices: you can turn left here and then immediately right into the parking area for the Nature Conservancy’s Santa Fe River Preserve, or you can continue straight ahead, along a dirt road, about half a mile to the paved parking area at the Randall Davey Audubon Center itself. There’s a great nature store here, and it’s the meeting place for the Saturday morning bird walks. Check their website for the calendar of events.

Randall Davey's House

The old Randall Davey House seen from inside the Preserve

Book Your Next Stay at Inn on the Alameda

The Zen Forest

The Zen Forest The Winsor Trail is Santa Fe’s gateway into the Pecos Wilderness from the west. Its most popular trailhead is near the western end of the large parking area of Ski Santa Fe, at an elevation of 10,240 feet. On the map for which I’ve provided...

read more
Jews of New Mexico

Jews of New Mexico

JEWS OF NEW MEXICO

Jewish history in New Mexico goes back, it has been argued, to the founding of the colony. There is evidence that some contemporary New Mexican Hispanics may be descended from “Crypto-Jews” or Marranos. These would have been Sephardic Jews during the 15th and 16th century who, under penalties of the inquisition, were forced to convert to Catholicism; yet still retained certain cultural markers of Jewish identity.

Temple Montefiore, Las Vegas, NM - First Jewish House of Worship in NM

Temple Montefiore, Las Vegas, NM –

First Jewish House of Worship in NM

Facing enormous consequences if caught, the “conversos” who chose to continue practicing Jewish rituals and identity found themselves forced to the edge of the Spanish Empire, or the New Mexican colonies of the Southwest.   Though the evidence is controversial, there have been both ethnographic and genetic pieces of evidence linking the latino culture of New Mexico with Jewish descent.  There are oral accounts of keeping practices like Kosher slaughter and celebration of the sabbath as well as DNA evidence.  One genetic study of 78 latino New Mexicans centering on Albuquerque found 30 displaying genetic markers associated with Jewish descent, markers found in only 1% of the general population.

Temple Beth Shalom, Santa Fe, NM

Temple Beth Shalom,

Santa Fe, NM

The history of Ashkenazic Jews in New Mexico is more recent and less controversial.  Like many pioneers, they welcomed the opportunities present with the opening of the Southwest and the United States’ control over the New Mexico territory.  Trade routes that were oriented to Mexico and were zealously guarded by Spanish policy became disrupted as New Mexico began to orient itself with the greater American market and economy.

Jewish heritage places high values on learning and education, and with a propensity for business, these immigrants were able to grow in prominence in the mercantile trade.

Some of the Jewish families who responded to these opportunities were the Bibo family, ten siblings who immigrated to New Mexico during the 1870s.  Three of them started mercantile businesses.  Jewish traditions of helping out family and relatives led to increased immigration as Jews prospered and sent for their families back east.  The Spiegelberg family, for instance, was a major influence in the territorial economy.  Wili Spiegelberg was one of the driving forces behind the establishment of the Second National Bank of Santa Fe.  The Spiegelbergs provided work and welcome for many Jewish immigrants, employing several members of the Bibo family and welcoming their cousins, the Zeckendorfs, who opened several stores in Santa Fe and one in Albuquerque.

After the Civil War, however, business got tougher and the Zeckendorfs headed to Tucson and opened a store there. Eventually they migrated back to New York where they became successful real-estate developers. In the 1980s, Bill and Nancy Zeckendorf returned again to Santa Fe and became leading developers and patrons of the arts, instrumental in both the growth of the Santa Fe Opera and the creation of the Lensic Performing Arts Center.

The Jewish community remains a vibrant one in Santa Fe and one which visitors can explore. During your next stay at the Inn, be sure to take a trip to the Santa Fe Opera House and the Lensic Performing Arts Center – two Santa Fe landmarks that exist today thanks to the hard work and dedication of my friends, the Zeckendorfs.

Bill and Nancy Zeckendorf, Dear Friends of Joe Schepps

Bill and Nancy Zeckendorf, Friends of Joe Schepps

Inn on the Alameda, That Enchanting Small Hotel in Old Santa Fe, proudly presents all historical blog posts written by Joe & Michael Schepps. Read about the authors here.

During your next stay at the Inn, be sure to take a trip to the Santa Fe Opera House

or the Lensic Performing Arts Center – two Santa Fe landmarks that exist today thanks to the hard work and dedication of my friends, the Zeckendorfs.

The Zen Forest

The Zen Forest The Winsor Trail is Santa Fe’s gateway into the Pecos Wilderness from the west. Its most popular trailhead is near the western end of the large parking area of Ski Santa Fe, at an elevation of 10,240 feet. On the map for which I’ve provided...

read more
How the West Was Fed: A Tale of Fred Harvey and His Girls

How the West Was Fed: A Tale of Fred Harvey and His Girls

How The West Was Fed:

A Tale Of Fred Harvey And His Girls

 

Will Rogers described Fred Harvey as the man that “kept the West in food…and wives.” Fred Harvey pioneered many of the innovative approaches to food service, hospitality, and of the Southwest style in both jewelry and architecture.

As a young freight broker, Fred was appalled at the lack of any coordinated approach, inconsistency of service and food quality available to rail passengers. Partnering with the country’s biggest railroad company, the AT & SF, Fred Harvey began first building restaurants and then hotels along the RR route from Chicago to Los Angeles, bringing at the time “ New York and London” quality food to the West. The greatest challenge was to serve excellent meals that could be enjoyed in 20 minutes or less – the allocated time for dining stops.

Fred Harvey

Fred Harvey’s commitment to excellence and a standard of quality and service set the tone for the changes the Railroad would bring to this new and growing part of our country. The opening of the Raton, NM pass to rail traffic in 1879, heralded the beginning of the end of the Old Santa Fe Trail, and this new mode of transportation, stretching all the way to the Pacific, required the creation of the first chain of restaurants, and then hotels. Standardization, so necessary then, later sadly grew into rampant American led, world-wide “white bread” commercialism. But then, understandably, everything had to be done the “Fred Harvey way,” which assured excellence and predictability to the diners heading west. This was how Fred Harvey fed the West.

Fred Harvey Lunchroom, Santa Fe Hotel, Canadia, Texas

Fred Harvey Lunchroom, Santa Fe Hotel, Canadia, TX

Scene from The Harvey Girls

Scene from “The Harvey Girls” Film

And how to keep the restaurant service consistent? Fred Harvey created a service army of honest, skilled, educated and attractive women – quickly dubbed “The Harvey Girls,” and from the 1880s until the end of the 1940s, the Harvey Girls totaled 20,000 young ladies spread out along the Western railroad stops. Here were the brides-to-be for the ranchers, merchants and entrepreneurs that grew this country.

The Harvey Girls Film Poster

And to assure a definitive style and architectural excellence, Fred Harvey brilliantly employed the great architect Mary Coulter to design his beautiful hotels…from Las Vegas, NM to Santa Fe, to Albuquerque and on past the Grand Canyon. Mary Coulter is credited with creating what would become the world recognized “Santa Fe Style.”

And finally, from simple counter sales in Gallup, NM, Fred Harvey brought together the Indian jewelers with their one-of-a-kind handicrafts, potters and weavers – orchestrating and coordinating their efforts into a look that became, like everything else Fred Harvey, a distinctive style that would lead the way for the future successful refinement and commercialization of Southwestern arts and crafts that we know so well today.

So, within a score of years, what began as an idea brought on by Fred Harvey’s distaste of bland and inconsistent railroad fare, turned into the first chain of restaurants, hotels and gift shops in the West. Today, “Fredheads” keep his legacy alive, honoring a man whose vision literally changed the West for the better in everything he touched.

Presently, the New Mexico History Museum has a “must see” show on display commemorating the great visionary and his Harvey Girls. And if you wish to delve more into this historical time, watch The Harvey Girls, a 1946 musical film starring Judy Garland about the opening of a “Harvey House” at a remote whistle stop to provide good food and company to railway travelers.

Judy Garland in The Harvey Girls

Discover the tradition of delicious fare & high service standards that Fred Harvey began

The Agoyo Lounge and the accommodations of the Inn on the Alameda embody Fred Harvey’s tradition of service.

The Zen Forest

The Zen Forest The Winsor Trail is Santa Fe’s gateway into the Pecos Wilderness from the west. Its most popular trailhead is near the western end of the large parking area of Ski Santa Fe, at an elevation of 10,240 feet. On the map for which I’ve provided...

read more
Santa Fe, Frozen in Time

Santa Fe, Frozen in Time

Santa Fe, Frozen in Time

 

I arrived in Santa Fe early on May 23, 1971. I remember it like it was yesterday.

I drove in from Las Vegas, NM, where I had toured Highlands University for a NM State teacher’s credential. At the time, I knew that I wanted to reside in New Mexico. Through years of college friendships and familial bonds in western New Mexico, I had developed close ties to the state. I was 23.

 

Day 1: Santa Fe Plaza, 1971

While passing the College of Santa Fe, I stopped, went in, and discovered that they had a teacher’s credential program. I told them my educational background and they accepted me into their summer program right on the spot. Just like that. No security checks, no contacting my university. The old days.

The same day, I opened my checking account on the historic Santa Fe plaza at First National Bank. No Homeland Security, background check, or tax ID number needed – just money and a signature. Nearly 44 years later, I still have the same checking account number.

santa-fe-obelisk-fall
At the time, the plaza was open to traffic on all sides. There were shoe and clothing stores, pharmacies, a barbershop, and a flower shop. I don’t recall a single gallery. Gas stations were situated catty-corner to the plaza on two sides, and the central obelisk still spoke of “savage natives.” This was before the word, “savage” was chiseled off.

There were only 3 or 4 realtors at the time, and I found a place on Cerro Gordo through the Richard Mares Agency. We put down our deposit and our last month’s rent, and moved in later that same afternoon. No credit checks on Credit Karma, no references to call. Just me, my wife, and our new home.

santa-fe-obelisk-plaque
Even with its modern changes, the history of Santa Fe remains captivating etched in stone.

Day 2: A Different Santa Fe

The next morning I was driving on St. Michael’s Drive, which was a still a two-lane street surround by mostly vacant land, when I heard my name on the radio! The since-departed Santa Fe Welcome Wagon was welcoming my wife and me to Santa Fe. They even mentioned some factoids about our lives that I had shared with the realtor.

Late that evening, my grandfather died in Dallas. Since we didn’t have cell phones, and it took a while to get a phone line, my father’s secretary began trying to locate us. The second realtor she called was Richard Mares, and he informed her of our whereabouts. As a courtesy, he also called the Santa Fe Police Department on our behalf. Soon after an officer pulled up to our house and respectfully informed me of my grandfather’s passing. He also told me where the nearest pay phone could be found, so I could call home.

When I think back on Santa Fe, it’s hard to imagine that there were more pawnshops and trading posts than galleries. I vividly remember Bob Ward’s “oldest trading post” on San Francisco, and The Pink Adobe and The Bull Ring were the only two “fancy” restaurants downtown. Can you imagine?
santa-fe-original-trading-post
Those were the times, not really that far-gone, that welcomed me here and successfully beckoned me to stay.

Let us be your Santa Fe Welcome Wagon

We hope we can captivate you the same way Santa Fe captivated me all those years ago.
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