Joe’s Blog: ZOZOBRA: OLD MAN GLOOM

 

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As with most historical ceremonies held by Santa Fe, the oldest capital city in the US, the tradition of the burning of this 50-foot tall effigy is linked to Spanish traditions, such as Fiestas, a celebration originally conceived in 1712 commemorating the peaceful re-conquest of Santa Fe by Don Diego de Vargas in 1692. Fiestas is both a civic and religious experience, lasting several days over a weekend in late summer, that includes the Children’s Pet Parade, which is not to be missed, as families decorate every imaginable pet from snakes to burros for a parade around the Plaza. Also a Hysterical/Historical Parade, poking fun at the town’s hysteria over its history. There is also an historically accurate and lavishly costumed re-enactment of the Entrada when Don Diego de Vargas returned to Santa Fe carrying the statue of La Madonna, which the fleeing Spanish had taken with them in 1680 at the outbreak of the Pueblo Revolt. As with most Santa Fe celebrations, there are food booths, an arts and crafts fair, dancing and a general sense of “fiesta” throughout the town with everyone yelling “Que Viva!” This is an abbreviated two-word phrase, meaning: “Long live Fiesta!”

reportingtexas.com

image from reportingtexas.com

In the midst of all of the fiesta splendor, there is one less cheerful event – a celebration of a darker sort: The Burning of Zozobra: Old Man Gloom.

 

In 1924, two of Santa Fe’s original Cinco Pintores (5 painters), conceived the idea of creating the opportunity for people to annually dispose of their worries and woes. Santa Feans, Gustauve Baumann and Will Shuster created the concept and subsequent tradition of the public burning of a 50-foot paper mache effigy of an old man by the name of Zozobra. Zozobra is Spanish for anxiety and people are encouraged to write down their sorrows, bad memories, general woes and even legal papers that they wish to see go up in smoke. A “sorrows” box is placed at the base of Zozobra into which, during the day of burning, people can drop their notes and documents as fodder for the grandest and most attended bonfire of the year.

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This giant old man gloom is built with hidden speakers, arms that mechanically wave, eyes that creepily dart from side to side, and even jaws that move. As the final hours before the burning of Old Man Gloom wind down, up to 50,000 people – young and old – fill Fort Marcy Park in excited anticipation of the lighting and burning of Zozobra. First everyone waits for dusk…then dancers appear taunting and gyrating at the old man’s base as thick, black smoke begins to slowly rise. Then the air is permeated with groans and moans, coming from the gut of Zozobra himself…People are yelling “Burn Him!” and hooting and hollering in anticipation of the final act of destruction of this Old Man Gloom. The excitement is electric and everyone is swept up into the contagious thrill of this amazing tradition. Many people’s memories go back to their earliest childhood years and the roar of pleasure when the flames finally burst up through the middle of the effigy is deafening!

This event is always worth the effort. Go early; bring folding chairs and beverages and snacks (no alcohol can be legally allowed inside the park for everyone’s safety). Spread out your blankets and bring the family, as this is traditionally a very family friendly evening. Zozobra is just one of the many events in our hometown that makes us the City Different and this is a weekend to attend at least several times in your life.

We hope you stop by the Inn on the Alameda and join us for a drink and toast to the burning of Zozobra and the disbursement of all our sorrows into the smoke filled heavens.

Joe’s Blog: RENAISSANCE FAIR(E)S

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As a former college student of the 1960´s, the first thing that pops into my mind when I hear the words ‘Renaissance Fair’ are the lyrics and melody of Simon and Garfunkel´s ‘Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme.’ This was one of the most beautiful songs from the flower child era, with an enchanting first verse: “Are you going to Scarborough Fair? Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme.”

My imagination races in every direction with wonderment about Scarborough Fair… Where is it? What is it? Does the Fair have the most beautiful perfume of fragrant herbs and spices? 

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The mystery evoked by the lyrics speaks to the power of the bazaar, the fair, the festival. The tradition of the annual Fair dates back to the pre-industrial age of farmsteads and crofters, where people would bring in their specialty products to trade and barter.  These fairs became ritualized, often tied into church festivals, and provided the opportunity for small-scale farmers and craftsmen to socialize and trade.  The participants of the fair became an important part of medieval life, and their descendants are seen today in the Renaissance Fairs that have become a part of American life.

If you have not attended one of these Fairs, you absolutely must as soon as possible. Fortunately the Santa Fe Renaissance Fair is on the very near horizon, and there are many year-round throughout the country – here is a calendar of nationwide events. Renaissance Fairs are celebrations and gatherings with a strong arts and crafts theme – with food, drink and music reminiscent of an imaginary Medieval Fair, incorporating elements of the historic and the fantastic.  It is a thrilling sight: flags, bells and banners swirl around strolling entertainers who bring a light-hearted, mystical and lyrical spirit to the free-flowing energy.  It is impossible not to be swept into the spontaneity and excitement these events create.

The appeal of these fairs are best described by writer Neil Steinberg, who said: “If theme parks, with their pasteboard main streets, reek of a bland, safe, homogenized white-bread America, a Renaissance Fair is at the other end of the social spectrum, a whiff of the occult, a flash of danger and a hint of the erotic. Here you can throw axes. Here, there are more beer and bosoms than you´ll find in all of Disney World.” … I  myself can imagine a Gypsy camp in Eastern Europe centuries ago as another image to add to the moving tapestry of my impressions of these Fairs…

I hope this blog post may entice you to experience the Santa Fe Renaissance Fair at El Rancho de las Golondrinas this September 20th-21st, as the lyrics of ‘Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme’ once enticed me.

 

Mike’s Blog: Turquoise, a Defining Element of the Southwest

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One of the most defining artistic and symbolic elements of the Southwest is turquoise, a stone that possesses a captivating quality to natives and passers-through alike. The name “Turquoise” is an iteration of “Turkey,” the country from which the first turquoise imports to Europe came. This greenish blue mineral, consisting of hydrous phosphate, copper and iron, first emerged in ancient Egypt, where it was placed in tombs around 3000 BC.

In both old and new world cultures, turquoise was/is considered a holy stone – used for protection against unnatural death and hailed as a symbol of healing for both the body and the sacred land.

In the Southwest in particular, its hue is reminiscent of rain, essential to life and rebirth in the Puebloan tradition.

 

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The story of turquoise in Santa Fe dates back over a thousand years (perhaps further), and is a complex one. The evidence of vast trade networks, connecting thousands of miles of land through multiple states and diverse cultural groups, has been recently uncovered by new archaeological techniques. Sharon Hull, a noted archaeologist, has spearheaded this endeavor by identifying clear evidence of pre-Columbian trade, stretching all the way from Nevada to the Cerrillos hills of Santa Fe.

While turquoise can be acquired today much easier than our ancestors’ methods, purchasing a piece of turquoise in Santa Fe ties you to the deep tradition of the bartering system of times passed. Most new turquoise jewelry sold today comes from mines in Nevada or Arizona, but the modern manufacturing tradition derives largely from the work of Fred Harvey and his collaboration with native New Mexican artisans. One of the fathers of modern tourism, Harvey pioneered many aspects of modern-day tourism. His handshake deal with the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad to build inns, restaurants, and shops with organized tours of native performers, along the various railway stops helped shape our conception of current cultural tourism. This led to what’s been called ‘the first chain restaurants,’ as well as helped define and create the modern demand for southwestern styled silver and turquoise jewelry. Examples of this antique jewelry can be found in galleries throughout town.

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Buying turquoise jewelry can be rewarding and intimidating all at once. Buying jewelry directly from native artisans at the Palace of the Governors located on the Santa Fe Plaza is one option. You can meet the artisans first hand and discuss the quality and history of the jewelry directly with the Native Americans who crafted it, placing yourself in an historical continuum of hundreds of years. The difference in cost between two roughly similar shaped and sized pieces can be thousands of dollars depending on whether the stone is natural or reconstituted and stabilized. Other options are to visit many well known and established shops in town that can take out most of the guesswork, and if you wish to read up on determining the quality of turquoise yourself, read through this guide that the Santa Fe Reporter wrote.

 

In addition to the native artisans present at the plaza, there are several Canyon Road galleries, located close to the Inn on the Alameda, that sell wearable turquoise art. For authentic Fred Harvey wares, Canyon Road offers the buyer many opportunities, including The Adobe Gallery and the Medicine Man gallery. Sessels on San Francisco St. and Keshi on Paseo de Peralta are additional shopping venues located close to the hotel.

The Inn on the Alameda strives to be the perfect ‘base camp’ for any shopping expedition and we would be happy to point you in the right direction based on your shopping desires.